Transit graph: Kepler measures the brightness of stars

 

Kepler measures the brightness of stars. The data will look like an EKG showing the heart beat. Whenever a planet passes in front of its parent star as viewed from the spacecraft, a tiny pulse or beat is produced. From the repeated beats we can detect and verify the existence of Earth-size planets and learn about the orbit and size of the planet. The scientific data from Kepler come in a different way than most astronomy missions. The Kepler spacecraft will not produce pretty pictures or even colorful spectrograms, but rather light curves derived from brightness changes collected from transits.

Four Large Flares in 48 Hours

A very energetic active region right at the Sun’s edge blasted out four X-class flares (largest class) in two days (May 13-15, 2013), as well as several less flares. The active region is rotating around so that it will be facing Earth in about a week. The flares, observed in extreme UV light by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, are seen as bright flashes. They were: an X1.7 flare on May 13 at 02:21 UT; an X2.8 flare on May 13 at 16:07 UT; an X3.2 on May 14 at 01:46 UT; and an X1 on May 15 at 01:44 UT .

Proxima Centauri ‘Earth-like’ planet

Proxima Centauri ‘Earth-like’ planet

Proxima Centauri 

 

Proxima Centauri was discovered by in august 2016, and is located over 4.2 billion light years, it’s the closest planet found out side our solar system in 20 years, it also sits perfectly in the habitable zone, where its not too hot nor too cold, for water to exist, which is one of the big conditions for a planet.

due to the distance it is from our planet, it makes it hard to identify if theirs any signs of life.

James Manners from University of Exeter stated:

“One of the main features that distinguishes this planet from Earth is that the light from its star is mostly in the near infra-red,”

However a lot more research and work is required before they fully understand if this planet can host life.

Facts and Information

Distance to Earth: 4.243 light years or 25 trillion miles from Earth
B−V color index: 1.82
U−B color index: 1.26
Absolute magnitude (MV): 15.60
Apparent magnitude (J): 5.357 ± 0.023
Luminosity (visual, LV): 0.00005 L
Mass: 0.123 ± 0.006
Radius: 0.141 ± 0.007
Estimated mass is at least 1.3 times that of the Earth.
Orbital period of approximately 11.2 Earth days
More Information can be found on: https://www.nasa.gov/proxima-centauri
Proxima Centauri planet

50 Stunning Photographs of Saturn taken by Cassini satellite

50 Stunning Photographs of Saturn taken by Cassini satellite

NASA has released raw images of the gran finale trip for Cassini, Satellite, they have posted 384,606 images that were taken by the satellite, as it makes its last journey.

Set off in 1999, it took 5 years to get there, arriving in 2004,it’s the first satellite to enter the orbit  of Saturn.

After 20 years, It’s finally coming to an end, it’s final mission will be ending between September and August.

Facts about the mission

Dimensions: 22 feet (6.7 meters)
height: 13.1 feet (4 meters) wide
Weight: 12,593 pounds (5,712 kg) with fuel, Huygens probe, adapter, etc; 4,685 pounds (2,125 kg) unfueled orbiter alone
Power: 885 watts (633 watts at end of mission) from radioisotope thermoelectric generators

NASA Released a statement 

“Full Transcript:
Cassini’s Grand Finale

03:39

A lone explorer, on a mission to reveal the grandeur of Saturn, its rings and moons.

After 20 years in space NASA’s Cassini spacecraft is running out of fuel. And so, to protect moons of Saturn that could have conditions suitable for life, a spectacular end has been planned for this long-lived traveler from Earth.

In 2004, following a 7-year journey through the solar system, Cassini arrived at Saturn. The spacecraft carried a passenger, the European Huygens probe — the first human-made object to land on a world in the distant outer solar system.

For over a decade, Cassini has shared the wonders of Saturn and its family of icy moons, taking us to astounding worlds where methane rivers run to a methane sea.

Where jets of ice and gas are blasting material into space from a liquid water ocean that might harbor the ingredients for life.

And Saturn — a giant world ruled by raging storms and delicate harmonies of gravity.

Now, Cassini has one last, daring assignment.

Cassini’s Grand Finale is a brand new adventure. Twenty-two dives through the space between Saturn and its rings. As it repeatedly braves this unexplored region,

Cassini seeks new insights about the origins of the rings, and the nature of the planet’s interior — closer to Saturn than ever before.

On the final orbit, Cassini will plunge into Saturn fighting to keep its antenna pointed at Earth as it transmits its farewell.

In the skies of Saturn, the journey ends, as Cassini becomes part of the planet itself.” Credit: NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech

 

Photographs

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You can view the full gallery here: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/galleries/raw-images/

Planet HD 189733b -Rains Of Terror

Planet HD 189733b, hasn’t got the best name for a planet, but guess we don’t know enough about it, to give it a name worth its beauty, this planet is stunning to look at, its a planet that stands out.

The planet only has one similar feature to earth;  its a blue dot that stands out in blackness, but that’s were similarities end.

The planet is the same size as Jupiter and its hotter then earth, so life on that planet isn’t likely. it goes around its host star around 2.2 Earth days.

The weather of the planet isn’t the best, lets just say you would rather stand in a wind storm on earth then planet HD 189733b, winds can blow up to 8,700 km/h, that’s 5,400 mph, which makes it 7 times the speed of sound. the planet is around 63 light years from us, so if you wasn’t planning to go there don’t worry we wouldn’t….well any time soon.

The planets blue colour is caused by light scattering off silicate particles in its atmosphere.

We have two other planets in our solar system which have that ocean blue look: Uranus and Neptune.

Planet HD 189733b was first discovered in 2005 however the colour of the planet was only figured out in 2013