Lyon Coat of Arms and Flag

Lyon coat of arms and flag crest

Lyon Coat of Arms

Lyon Coat of arms
Lyon Coat of arms

The coat of arms has a lion symbol and has been used on the seals of the city since the 13th century, it was granted to the city by King Philippe V in 1320, since then the coat of arms hasn’t been changed.

The Lion on the coat of arms stands for ‘courage and Strength’.

Since 1949 the city was granted the right to use the chain of the Légion d’honneur around the shield, Légion d’honneur is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte.

City Motto

“avant avant lion le melhor”, translates to “Before before the melhor”

Flag of Lyon

Flag of Lyon
Flag of Lyon

In the 13th century, the Merchant guilds revolted against the archbishop Count of Lyon and used the banner with a lion on it, to show their own strength and in 1320, the King of France, Philippe V forced Archbishop Pierre de Savoie to free Lyon and  later on the Province of Lyonnais was established and the Municipal banner of arms of Lyon, was granted to Lyon.

Official blazon:

“De gueules au lion d’argent; au chef cousu d’azur à trois fleurs de lis d’or.” translates to “Gules to the lion Argent; with a head stitched with azure three fleurs-de-lis of gold.”

 

Aberdeen Coat of arms and Flag

Aberdeen Coat of arms and flag

Aberdeen Coat of Arms

Aberdeen coat of arms

The coat of arms consists of three towers within a border, which are decorated with Fleur-de-lis, the three castle represent the three buildings that stood on the three hills of medieval Aberdeen, known as the Aberdeen Castle on the Castle Hill, the City gates on the Port Hill and a Chapel on St Catherine’s Hill. However only the Aberdeen Castle stands today and St Catherine’s Hill was levelled out.

There are two supporter leopards, one on each side, with their faces, facing towards the viewer, According to the Legends, the two beasts were granted by James I as a gesture of thanks to the burgh for underwriting his expenses while he was help captive in England.

The Motto on the coat of arms “Bon Accord”, means “Good Agreement” In French, It is said that its use dates back to the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th Century, When Robert the Bruce and his Soldiers laid siege to Aberdeen Castle and before destroying the castle in 1308 and taking back Aberdeen from the English.

The Coat of arms were granted on July 29th, 1996 however the city seals were about before the 15th century.

 

Flag of Aberdeen 

Aberdeen City Flag

The Flag of Aberdeen dates back to the 15th century if not before, with three towers represting the three hill tops of Aberdeen and decorated with fleurs-de-lis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucca Coat of Arms and Flag

Lucca Coat of arms and Flag

Lucca Coat of Arms

 

Lucca Coat of arms
Lucca Coat of arms

Truncated silver and red. The coat of arms is surmounted by a marquis crown and is surrounded by a branch of oak and one of laurel knotted together by a red ribbon with white lines. In the ancient times, Lucca adopted the arms of the various Lords ruling the town (Pisa, Castracani, Spinola, Scaligeri etc.). When the Emperor Charles IV, in the year 1369, restored the autonomy of Lucca, the local council adopted the coat of arms. The coat of arms per fess white and red was called “balzana”, and keeps this name today.

 

 

 

 

 

Lucca Flag

Lucca Coat of Arms and Flag 1
Lucca Official Flag

The City and Province of Lucca adapted the Flag color and design from the Historic state of the Republic of Lucca, which lasted from 1160 to 1805 on the central Italian Peninsula. The Lucca flag consists of two equally broad stripes, the red one at the bottom and white one on top.The colors are of uncertain interpretation. The red is probably part Ghibelline, which Lucca joined in the first half of the eleventh century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

London Coat of Arms and Flag

Coat of arms and flag of London

London Coat of Arms

Coat of arms London
London Coat of arms

The Coat of Arms of the City of London is the Official coat of arms of London.

The City of London has a number of different shields on which the arms are displayed on and the crest is displayed on a helmet above the shield, supporters on either side and a motto displayed on a scroll beneath the arms.

  • Arms: Argent a cross gules and in the first quarter a sword in pale points upwards of the last.
  • Crest: on a Wreath Argent and gules a dragon’s sinister wing argent charged on the underside with a cross throughout gules.
  • Supporters: on both sides is a dragon Argent charged on the underside of the wings with a cross throughout gules.

The motto of the city is written in Latin “Domine dirige nos” which translates as “Lord, direct (guide) us”, the motto was recorded as early as of 1633.

a banner of the arms, which was designed on the shield, is flown as a flag of the city.

The very first time that the coat of arms appeared was on a seal from 1380, the sword has often been described as a dagger with which Sir William Walworth, who was the Mayor of London, Stabbed the rebel Wat Tyler on June 15th, 1381, it is also said that the sword was granted by King Richard III, as a reward for William Walworth’s services to the King. However, both of the stories have no historical evidence to prove them right.

The dragons on the crest appeared for the first time on an illustration in a book from 1633. The book also first mentions the motto “Domine dirige nos”, Book: The Survey of London by Stow.

 

Flag of London

Flag of London
Flag of London

The official flag of London is based on the original flag of England, however, unlike the England Flag, it has a cross of St George’s Cross, a white background with a red sword in the upper hoist canton, located on the top left side. It’s believed that the sword represents the sword that beheaded Saint Paul, who is the Patron saint of the city.

The tip of the sword always points upwards, which means when the flag is held on its side as a banner, the sword would point to face hoist and would be located on the left side as its hanging down.

The Flag does not represent Greater London area, Greater London does not have its own flag. only the historical city of London represents the flag and the banner of London.  which only covers 1 square mile.