Glasgow Science Centre

Glasgow Science Centre

Glasgow science centre is situated in the Clyde Waterfront Regeneration area, on the south bank of the River Clyde, Opened on the 5th of June 2001 by Queen Elizabeth II, The Science Centre has three main buildings, the Science Hall, Glasgow Tower and an IMAX cinema.

The Science Centre was part of an ongoing redevelopment of the Pacific Quay, which used to be a cargo port, known as the Prince’s Dock. The architects of the Glasgow Science Centre were Building design Partnership.

The Science hall has three floors with lots of interactive exhibits, which has a dedicated science show theatre and Scottish Power Planetarium.

  • The first floor has interactive exhibits and gives access to the show theatre and glasgow science centre Planetarium.
  • The second floor where you can find a Lab, which is used as an educational workshop and Live world of work interactive exhibition.
  • The third floor had a refurbishment in 2012 and later reopened in 2013, which has human health and well-being exhibition, over 115 interactive exhibits can be found, research capsules and live laboratory experiences.

On the Ground Floor, you find a ticket desk, Gift Shop, a Cloakroom and Cafes, as well as a number of multipurpose room spaces which are used for variety of educational and corporate purposes.

The IMAX cinemas was the first IMAX cinema built in Scotland, with the seats capacity of 370, which shows 3D and 2D films in IMAX format. Cineworld operates the IMAX Cinema and has since opened a Starbucks on site.

The Glasgow Tower was designed to be tallest freely rotating tower in the world however due to a number of issues the tower had to be closed from 2010 to 2014. The Tower was designed by architect Richard Horden, with engineering designed by Buro Happold.

The cost of this project was 75 million and additional 10 million for the Glasgow tower, The Millennium Commissions funded 37 million.

Glasgow Science Centre is fun for all ages specially families, to explore the presents science and technology in an inspiring and unique way, you can enjoy over 400 interactive exhibits from learning and discovering renewable energy to making wind powered cars.

Glasgow Science Centre

Telephone: 0141 420 5000 |  Official Website  |  Facebook  | Twitter | Instagram

The Scottish Tourist Board, Visit Scotland, has awarded the science centre five star rating for the visitor attraction category.

Glasgow Science Centre manages the visitors centre for the Whitelee Wind Farm, which opened in 2009.

Other Information

  • Weather policy: The Glasgow Tower may close due to high winds.
  • Pets allowed: Assistance/Guide Dogs only.

Facilities

  • Hearing Loops
  • Parking
  • WiFi
  • Level Access
  • Accessible parking or drop-off point available

How to get there

  • By Bus: Bus services Stagecoach X19, First Bus No 90  and McGill’s Bus 23 and 26.
  • By Subway: the closest station is Cessnock, takes about 25 to 30 minutes walk.
  • By Bike: Glasgow Science Centre is close to National Cycle Route 7.
  • By Car: From the Clydeside Expressway, take SECC (E), then follow the tourist signs, GSC customer car park available, more information.

*Please note: any transport services may change since this post, please do some research before setting off*

Admission

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Adult £11.00
Children £9.00
IMAX Documentary £2.50
Planetarium £3.00
Glasgow Tower £3.50

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*Please note: prices may change yearly or during holiday and peak seasons, please visit the official website for more details *

Opening Hours

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Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 10:00 AM–3:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM–3:00 PM
Friday 10:00 AM–3:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM–5:00 PM
Sunday 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

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*Please note: opening times may very during holidays and other events, please visit the official website for more details*

Location

Address: 50 Pacific Quay, Glasgow G51 1EA

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Glasgow Statistics and figures

Glasgow

Glasgow In Numbers

 

Estimated population of Glasgow City

By Age Group

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Age Group Male Population Female Population Total Population
0-15 49,750 47,782 97,532
16-29 71,239 73,563 144,802
30-44 67,001 65,340 132,341
45-59 57,289 62,410 119,699
60-74 34,833 37,763 72,596
75+ 14,163 25,207 39,370

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Births in Glasgow City

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Gender Births Year
Male 3,823 2014
Female 3,642 2014

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Deaths and age specific death rates by age group

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Age Groups Deaths in Glasgow City
0 90
1-14 44
15-29 191
30-44 735
45-64 3,371
65+ 14,578

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Percentage of ethnic minorities in Glasgow

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White 88.3% 2011
Asian  8.1% 2011
Black 2.4% 2011
Muslim 5.4% 2011

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Year Population Growth Rate (%) Growth

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Year Population Growth Rate Growth
2030 1,360,000 (estimated) 4.13% Table
2025 1,306,000 (estimated) 4.15% 52,000
2020 1,254,000 (estimated) 1.79% 22,000
2017 1,232,000 0.74% 9,000
2015 1,223,000 1.33% 16,000
2010 1,207,000 1.34% 16,000
2005 1,191,000 0.93% 11,000

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Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art GoMA

Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art

Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art is situated on the royal exchange square and displays works by international and local artists and even the tension and complexities of our contemporary society via it’s major biannual projects.

The Modern art gallery opened in 1996 and housed in a neoclassical building, the building was first built in 1778 as a townhouse of  William Cunninghame of Lainshaw, who was a wealthy Tobacco Lord in Glasgow.

Before the building was turned in to a Art Gallery, it was used by the Royal Bank of Scotland, which later got moved onto Buchanan Street, then became a Royal Exchange; the building was in the centre for business and commercial exchange, where goods and information were traded and in 1954, the Glasgow District Libraries moved the Stirling Library in to this building, later the library got moved again to Miller Street and the building received a major refurbishment to house the Modern Art Gallery.

Gallery of Modern Art is the most visited Modern art Gallery in Scotland. it offers its visitors stories and experiences by collecting, identifying and showing important work of its artists.

The gallery specialising in artists whose issues, impacts and interests are shared by those in Glasgow.

Exhibitions:

  • Polygraphs (17 February – 20 May 2018/ Entry: Free/Open during regular hours)
  • Stephen Sutcliffe: Work from the Collection (22 September 2017- 21 January 2018)

You can find a library, a cafe and free internet access as well as extensive collections of art and design books, alongside its general books.

Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art
Inside Gallery of Modern Art Museum

Telephone: 0141 287 3005 | Official Website | Twitter | Facebook

How to get here:

  • Subway: Five minutes walk from St Enoch Subway Station
  • Train Station: Five minutes walk from Queens Street train Station & Argyle Street & Glasgow Central
  • Walking: located on Royal Exchange Square, In the city centre, 5 to 10 minutes walk from any where in the city.
  • Bus: any buss that goes to Glasgow city centre.

Opening Hours – Free Admission

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Monday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Friday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

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Closed on: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and 1 and 2 January.

Location

Address: Royal Exchange Square, Glasgow G1 3AH

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Glasgow Necropolis

Glasgow Necropolis

The Glasgow Necropolis is situated on the hill to the east of the Glasgow Cathedral,The land that the Necropolis stands on was purchased by the Glasgow’s Merchants House,and used as a Fir park until the group agreed that the land would be better used as Glasgow’s version of the world famous Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

The Main entrance to the Necropolis has a bridge over the Molendinar Burn, David Hamilton designed the bridge and it was completed in 1836. the bridge is known as the “Bridge of Sighs”. the ornate s gates which restrict access onto the bridge was built in 1838 by bothers; David and James Hamilton.

In-between the gates and the bridge are three modern memorials:  memorial to the Korean War; a memorial to Glaswegian recipients of the Victoria Cross and a memorial to still-born children.

War Hero Graves

The Necropolis holds graves of eighteen commonwealth service personnel, which are split between the two world wars, thirteen from World War One and five from World War Two.

The grave are registered and maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, the highest ranking officer that is buried here is, Lieutenant-General Sir James Moncrieff Grierson, who died in August 1914.

You can find amazing architecture such as sculpture and interesting stories, along with around 3,500 tombs but around 50,000 burials happened in this cemetery.

Glasgow Necropolis
Photography by: Robert Brown

Glasgow Necropolis is located next to the Glasgow cathedral, why not explore the Crypt within the Cathedral, which was built in the mid 1200’s.

James Stevens Curl described the Necropolis as “literally a city of the dead

Guided tours are available, you can find out information about the 37 acre cemetery full of wonderful architecture, sculpture and fascinating stories.

Telephone Number: 0141 287 3961 | Tour Information | Official website

Opening Hours

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Monday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Friday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Sunday 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

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Location

Address: Castle St, Glasgow G4 0UZ

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Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is situated on Argyle Street, in the West End of the city, on the banks of the River Kelvin, across Kelvin Hall, which is styled like the museum in the 1920’s.

The Museum closed in 2003 and reopened on 11th July 2006 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, after receiving a three-year refurbishment and restoration, since its reopening the museum has been one of the most popular attractions in Scotland. Features 22 themed, state of the art galleries displaying a surprising 8,000 objects.

The refurbishment and restoration cost around £28 Million, the large basement area had an extension so ‘its possible to accommodate the 8,000 exhibits, new display layout was build and a way-finding scheme was put in place to make it easier for visitors to move around the building, you can also find a new restaurant area.

The Funding for this refurbishment came from Heritage Lottery Fund which funded nearly 13 Million, The European Regional Development and Glasgow City Council funded 12 Million, which includes 2.5 Million from Private Sponsorships and the Kelvingrove Refurbishment Appeal, and Historic Scotland funded half a million.

On October 6th, 2017, The Museum and Art Gallery introduced world’s first museum display on Alcoholics Anonymous, AA, in the community exhibition space. The exhibition displays the history and the ongoing commitment, from the very first AA meeting in Scotland.

The exhibition contains photographs, objects, significant documents and letters, and newspaper clippings that chart the founding of and vital role undertaken by the group across Scotland today.

The collections at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery are extensive, wide-ranging and internationally significant. you can find collections from Egyptian antiquities and European art to furniture, natural history, textiles, glass, jewellery, ceramics,  metalwork and world-class collection of arms and Armour.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
Christ of St John of the Cross – Salvador Dali

One of the most famous paintings that are on display in the Kelvingrove Museum is the  Salvador Dali masterpiece ‘Christ of St John of the Cross’.

Other famous paintings and structures on display:

  • A spitfire plane hanging from the ceiling in the west court;
  • Sir Roger the Asian elephant;
  • The Floating Heads by Sophie Cave;
  • Portrait of the Art Dealer Alexander Reid by Vincent van Gogh;
  • A Man in Armour by Rembrandt;
  • Jubilee bust of Queen Victoria. Francis John Williamson, 1887.
  • Paul Gauguin, Østre Anlæg Park,Copenhagen 1885
  • Mummified man’s head. Greek-Roman Period, 332 BCE to 395 CE

Kelvingrove is open to everyone and has displays which are designed to keep the children in mind, making it a lot more user interaction, throughout the Museum.

spitfire plane
Picture of spitfire plane by Mike Hardisty
TELEPHONE: 0141 276 9599   |  Official Website  | Official FacebookEmail Address

Getting There

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum situated in Kelvingrove park that’s on Argyle Street, the museum is close to Glasgow University and only a mile and a half from Queen Street Station and Glasgow City Centre, however, it’s only half a mile away from the River Clyde and the SECC.

  • Car  & Car Park Area: You can find parking on the Kelvingrove park and opposite side of Argyle Street, near the Kelvin Hall.  If you planning to drive, the Museum is only 6 minutes from the M8.
  • Subway: The Kelvin Hall subway station is only 5 minutes walk. You can also alight at the Kelvinbridge subway and walk 15 minutes through Kelvingrove Park.
  • Train Station: The Patrick Rail Station is only 15 minutes walk.
  • Bus Services: A number of buses operate near Kelvingrove, number 2, 3, 9,16,18,42,62, 64  and 77 all stop outside Kelvingrove.

*Please note: any transport services may change since this post, please do some research before setting off*

Disability Information

Kelvingrove has easy access for Wheelchair users and a lift to give access to the main Gallery areas, Toilets are accessible for both males and females. wheelchair users can access the cafe area.

Disabled parking or drop-off point available.

Opening Hours – Free Entry

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Monday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

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*Please note: opening times may very during holidays and other events, please visit the official website for more details*

Location

Address: Argyle St, Glasgow G3 8AG

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Riverside Museum

Riverside Museum

The Riverside Museum is situated on the Glasgow museum of Transport, which is at the point-house Quay, in the Glasgow Harbor. The Museum opened it’s doors to the public in June 2011, Designed by Zaha Hadid, architects and engineers Buro Happold.

The Project cost around £74 Million, the Glasgow city council funded £50.9 million and the heritage lottery funded £18.1 Million, and the public appeal funded £5 Million.

The main purpose of this stunning building is to replace the previous home for the cities transport collection, which was located at Kelvin Hall, opposite the Kelvingrove Museum.

Over 3,000 objects are on display, housing many of the existing collections of Glasgow Museum of Transport, the museum went on to acquire more to enhance the experience, some of the new collections are:

  • L. S. Lowry: Cranes and Ships, Glasgow Docks, which was acquired at Christie’s in November 2005 for £198,400.
  • SAR Class 15F 4-8-2 steam locomotive, No.3007, which was bought in 2006 from Transnet.

Around 150 interactive displays to keep the youth interested and help them interact and discover how life was like in Glasgow, Glasgow’s history from its days as a maritime powerhouse to the daily lives of those that lived there in the early-mid twentieth century; Walk the streets and shops, were you can explore the merchandise and fashion.

There are nine different display themes:

Riverside Museum

  • Trans​port and Leisure
  • The Streets
  • Made in Scotland
  • Looks and Fashion
  • The River Clyde
  • Crossing the World
  • Cutting Edge: Past, Present and Future
  • Disasters and Crashes
  • Getting There

Only 2 years after being opened the museum received an award, winner of the 2013 European Museum of the Year award on 18th May 2013, In 2015 the museum became the fifth most popular attraction in Scotland, with over 1.1 million visitors.

Riverside Museum

Telephone Number: 0141 287 2720 | Official Website | Official Facebook

 

How to get here

 

  • By Train: The Partick Station is the closes train station, it’s around 10 minutes walk to the riverside museum
  • By Car: Motorway from the M8, take junction 19 and go west bound along the Clydeside Expressway A814 for about one mile to Pointhouse road. Then turn left into the Riverside Car Park area.
  • By Bus:  Take the Glasgow City bus: 100
  • By Taxi: taxi trip from Glasgow city centre will take about 5 minutes.
  • walking: you can walk from the Glasgow city centre to the museum, it will take around 45 minutes.

Opening Hours

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Monday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Tuesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wednesday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Friday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

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Location

Address: 100 Pointhouse Rd, Glasgow G3 8RS

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